Strategies for Private Cloud Initiatives

Later this week I’ll be presenting as a part of our EMC Live! webcasts on Building Strategies for Private Cloud Initiatives. I’ve been thinking more about what EMC’s Private Cloud vision means and how it is being implemented by our customers.¬† The initial idea of Private Cloud being a destination, part of a linear progression does a bit of a disservice to the whole concept of cloud computing and the control and choice offered by these new models.¬† Many companies are already thinking about Private Cloud as an approach to balancing their IT Service portfolio across internal and external resources based on criteria like cost and risk.¬† In my opinion, and I think EMC’s strategy and approach on Private Cloud bears this out, Governance, Risk Management and Compliance (GRC) is what makes the Cloud private.

Organizations have had a portfolio approach to IT for quite some time, now the various components within that portfolio might have started out as Mainframe, Open Systems and x86 in their own data center, or it could’ve been App Dev/Test and Pre-Prod in their data centers and Production at a hosting facility, and many, many other permutations.¬† Until recently there have always been pretty significant differences between those IT Services in the Portfolio and usually different management interfaces, organizations, reporting, etc. associated with each of them.¬† I posit that an integrated GRC framework with a Unified Service Portal not only bind the portfolio together and provides commonality in terms of how IT’s customers provision, manage and report on their services, but that they provide the framework for efficiency, control and choice which are the hallmarks of EMC’s Private Cloud vision.¬† This allows, as the portfolio matures and the GRC framework becomes more integrated, the CIO to deliver against the CEO’s expectations of cost reduction, the CISO/CLO’s expectation of a secure and compliant environment and his or her own expectation for more automation and transparency.¬† The goal then becomes not having only one method of computing achieved via a linear transformation of IT, but rather a portfolio of services delivered via several methods that is balanced for cost and risk with the ease of consumption and transparency of the public cloud and all the security and compliance associated with the data center.

I’ve geared my presentation for Thursday to address some tactical approaches to implementing such a strategy with achievable early successes to build momentum for the adoption of the model.¬† I’d welcome discussion, questions, another perspective via the comments, engagement via Twitter or on the webcast session.

Please feel free to register here and join in the conversation:

EMC Live Webcast:
Create an Architecture and Roadmap for Your Private Cloud

Thursday, May 6, 2010
8:00 am PT / 11:00 am ET / 15:00 GMT

Register Today!

The private cloud vision has captured the attention of enterprise IT leaders and strategists because it promises unprecedented economies of scale and dramatically improved business agility.

EMC Consulting experts can help you find the best path to the private cloud by leveraging virtualization, pooling enterprise resources, and adopting a service-oriented model.

Attend this webcast and learn how to:

  • Identify the key attributes of a private cloud architecture
  • Establish a business case for private cloud
  • Develop a high-level architectural plan for private cloud
  • Transform operations into a service-oriented, self-service model
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The Web at 20!

The most recent edition of EMC’s ON Magazine contained a whole series of articles and musings celebrating the Web at 20 years and imagining what the next 20 years will bring for it. The EMC Community of bloggers has taken this meme and shared a number of very cool stories and ideas. I’ve been tagged by Christine Christopherson, one of our very talented user experience designers, to contribute my story and ideas for the future of the Web. Like my fellow EMC’ers I’ll be addressing the following three questions:

How has the web changed your life?
How has the web changed business and society?
What will the web look like in 20 years?

How has the web changed my life?
I was a research assistant in the Physics Department at the University of Notre Dame during the summer of 1991 working with Prof. Carol Tanner’s team researching Optical Atom Traps. The lab I was working in was not too far away from the computer lab with the recently acquired NeXT workstations. These things were exceedingly cool as up to that point I’d only been exposed to Apple II’s in my rudimentary programming classes and rather clunky IBMs that my Dad got through work. There was a team at CERN that was doing very similar work to the ND team and they were publishing their notes and results to an internal system utilizing the CERN httpd server, which funnily enough ran very well on NeXT. At this point I’d never heard of Tim Berners-Lee or his grand vision, it was simply regarded as the next wave of Physics documentation management. I remember being a little dismissive of it at that point, mostly because I was just in love with lab notebooks and couldn’t see how a computer would be better than that.

I forgot about httpd for two years until I was a software engineering student at the Illinois Institute of Technology and got reacquainted with the very nascent Web. I discovered Yahoo and all this new content that was coming online and played around with the W3C httpd server more, learning about HTML and UNIX administration in the process. The Web changed my life because it was the gateway drug to Solaris and Irix I must be honest. I became a UNIX snob, thrilled by the power of the Sun Sparcs and SGI Indys running their server daemons and databases. The Web and the openness of its communication lured me away from the closed systems that I had been programming for, after seeing the power of the Web there was no way I was going to sit in a cube and code 1 function or class for some humongous software package for three years. I became a Web administrator at Chicago Kent College of Law supporting the Circuit Court and the paperless law school and from there I went into consulting for first the Web, then intranets, then Data Centers until finally I was running operations for MyPoints.com, one of the top 10 web properties in 1999 and 2000. I learned a lot along the way about connecting people and ideas and have been able to develop a much more expanded vision of the power and purpose of systems and I am very grateful.

How has the web changed business and society?
Let me count the ways, they are legion. The power of the web to bring people and information together is exactly what drew me to it. It’s changed the way that I do just about everything, from shopping and learning about new products to finding information, teaching my daughters, watching movies and TV and interacting with my friends and peers. I think it is great the way that many companies are expanding their use of the Web, engaging their customers, learning what they expect of the products and services, how they’re being used, how they could be improved and allowing customers to get together to share even more about themselves around a shared passion or interest facilitated by that company. The Web has even changed product design, more and more companies crowdsourcing their designs or creating contests via the Web to develop new products. Nike has done a great job of this allowing everyone to design their own custom shoes and hosting design competitions online. Awesome stuff. Web-enabled customer forums help people get answers, best practices, unvarnished opinions and new contacts all in one place. EMC has done a ton of work in this area and I’m proud of the communities we’ve built for our customers. Gina Minks blogs often about our communities and has done a ton of work setting them up and managing them.

What will the Web look like in 20 years?
Well there certainly has been a lot written about the future of the Web and Technology but I’ll add my 2 cents. I am very much in the school of Neal Stephenson and his views presented in Snow Crash and The Diamond Age. The Web will become more immersive and more pervasive, if that’s even possible. I’m not sure if Virtual Reality will really take hold, but there certainly is a lot of potential there. I think the biggest differences we’ll see is around search and the ability to federate searches and be able to more quickly integrate and analyze the results a la Wolphram|Alpha on steroids. We’ll also see a lot more integration of location aware and other context based integration into search and content presentation. I’m especially excited by the possibilities of more integration of open-source and crowd-source design like that at Local Motors and in the Makers by Cory Doctorow. I guess I’d sum it up by saying ubiquitous access, high bandwidth, context aware natural language search and analytics with data privacy and even more by the way of integration of social networks and academics etc. Needless to say I am excited to be a part of the continued transformation.

At this point I’d like to tag that font of information Christopher Kusek aka CXI and Kathrin Winkler who I hope will talk about the Web and sustainability in 20 years!

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Five Years

I thought I’d post a few thoughts and get back into the swing of blogging on the occasion of my five year anniversary with EMC Consulting.¬† The last five years have brought a huge amount of change for me both personally and professionally.¬† I joined EMC Consulting two weeks after finding out my wife was pregnant with our first child, and the changes have just kept coming from then on.¬† I had spent the previous ten years working for small organizations and then growing with venture backed start-ups.¬† This new transition in many ways was my graduation into “adulthood”, first time working for a large company supporting well established products.¬† I was very hesitant at first, but haven’t regretted the decision once in the last five years.

In many ways the transition wasn’t as difficult as I thought it might be, while EMC is a very large company the organization I joined was only a couple hundred back then.¬† We’ve both grown a lot in the last five years, I went from being a project manager to global CTO for my practice and the organization has gone from a few hundred people to a 2700 person global organization.¬† It’s been exciting and back breaking and fun.¬† While the consulting side has been growing the overall make up of the company has changed dramatically too, more than 50% of our revenue coming from software and services, a real sea change from where we were five years ago.¬† I’ve been lucky enough to watch our product portfolio morph into what I do truly believe is the most comprehensive in the industry for information management, we’ve accomplished much more than I would’ve hoped for in 2004.

This has been a real milestone for me, for ten years I hopped between jobs just about every year seeking new opportunities and challenges, constantly looking for the next organization I could help grow, not really wanting to grow stale in my role.¬† I can honestly say that hasn’t been a worry for me the last five years, constant challenges and new opportunities.¬† For a long time I never thought I’d find a place to settle down, but I can easily see myself working for EMC in 2014, and I couldn’t be happier about it.¬† So as I look back on the last five years I am grateful: for the work, the opportunities and mostly the incredible people that I have the privilege of working with.

Here’s to another five great years!

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